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Travel

Margarita Mayhem

By | Beverages, Consumption, Food for thought, Recipes, Terminology, Travel | No Comments

In celebration of National Margarita Day, here’s your boozy history lesson! In 1937, the Cafe Royal incorporated a cocktail book that had a recipe for a Picador using the same amount of tequila, triple sec and lime juice as a Margarita. There is a very early story of the Margarita being invented in 1938 by Carlos Herrera at his restaurant Rancho La Gloria. He created this concoction for a customer who was allergic to a lot of spirits but not tequila. Whichever story is true, we love a refreshing Marg on a warm… no, let me correct myself, ANY day. The “Original Margarita” recipe given by Cointreau has 1 part white tequila, 1/2 part Cointreau and 1/2 part fresh lime juice. We believe the key ingredient is not only great tequila but the freshly squeezed lime juice!

Here’s a different version of the Margarita to try at home and impress your friends, family or just yourself:

Spicy Grapefruit Margarita- yield 1 drink

Drink:

1 tsp agave nectar or 2 tsp simple syrup

1 oz freshly squeezed lime juice

2 oz grapefruit juice (you can use half of a grapefruit)

2 oz blanco/silver Tequila (1.5 oz if you like it less strong)

1 thinly sliced jalapeño

Garnish: 

2 parts salt

1 part chili powder

sugar

lime wedges

grapefruit wedges

Method:

Prepare your garnish and glass: On a flat plate, mix together salt and chili powder. Take your grapefruit slices (make sure you cut a small slice in the middle of each), lightly toss them in the sugar. Run your lime along the glass rim then roll it into your salt mixture.

In a cocktail shaker: add lime juice, agave nectar or simple syrup and jalapeños. Use a muddler to crush the jalapeños, pour in the grapefruit juice and tequila, top the shaker with ice and close. Shake your heart out!

Strain the mixture into your prepped glass. Garnish with your sugared grapefruit and enjoy!

The truth behind Tapas (Tapas or Tapeo)

By | Consumption, Dining, Food for thought, Food Trends, Photography, Recipes, Terminology, Travel | No Comments

Tapas are all the rage in Spain, and are the norm. A ‘tapa” small bite of free food that accompanies any beverage (alcoholic or not) consumed at any bar of the Iberian Peninsula. You heard that right, tapas are free in Spain!

Tapas are one of the most acclaimed memories from any traveler who has spent time sipping a cold “cerveza” or any Spanish “vino”. Tapa literally means “lid” or “to cover” something. Every bar in Spain has its own specialty tapas, ranging from the Gambas al Ajillo (Garlic Shrimp) spicy potatoes (Patatas Bravas) to stewed snails (Caracoles) or the classic serrano ham and manchego cheese.

A couple of theories indicate the origins of the famous tapa dish. The most traditional origin of tapas began with the proliferation of fruit flies around the southern vineyards during spring and sizzling summer season. Fruit flies are those magical bugs that can appear by hundreds and all disappear in a fraction of a second without a trace. They also have a “sophisticated “nose for diving in any fermented liquid, alcoholic or not.

Well, the purpose of the “tapa” was to cover the glass during conversation at the southern vineyards in the spring and summer to avoid the flying swimmers in the glass. The proprietor of one of this establishment had a genius idea……. why not placing a small plate on top of the glass?? And then they added a piece of cheese or cured meat to the lid…. This is so far, the most believe assumption about this world phenomena!

Another interesting theory of the tapas origin derived during the seasonal local festivities in Seville, located at the south-east part of the country. King Alfonso XIII was sipping a reasonable quantity of wine, when the monarch started to feel a little bit tipsy. He suddenly demanded a snack to sober up, in order to keep enjoying the vino without any symptom of intoxication. The tapa has reached incredible popularity around the world due to its simplicity in nature and ability to customize based on locality.

Let’s talk a little bit about the “Tapeo” or the tapas hopping movement, a whole entire experience that I recommend to anyone who comes to Spain! Any day is perfect for it, but one of the best days for the tapas hunt will be during the weekend, where everybody gets out of the house to enjoy the Mediterranean sun. Here’s how to master tapas hopping: Gather a small group of family or friends, find a good starting bar and keep going up or down the neighborhood streets looking for the desired specialty. Don’t forget that every glass of wine or beer will come up with a little surprise full of flavor that will continue during your gastronomical experience.

Here’s an easy tapa you can make at home and enjoy with a nice glass of white Spanish wine.

Gambas al Ajillo (Garlic Shrimp)

YIELD 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

12 ea. Medium Size Raw Shrimp (Peeled)

4 Tbsp. Olive Oil

2 ea. Garlic Cloves Fine Sliced

½ Tbsp. Cayenne Pepper Fine Sliced

Salt and White Pepper to taste

METHOD

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.

Add garlic; cook, stirring until garlic is fragrant and golden (but not brown), about 30 seconds. Add sliced cayenne pepper, cook for 10 seconds, add shrimp; raise heat to medium-high and cook, stirring often, until shrimp are opaque for 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.
Serve immediately with some toasted bread on the side for dipping!

By: Chef Daniel Graban-Lopez

Buen provecho!

KOR Food Innovation collaborates with industry leaders to promote California Figs

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John Represents FigsDuring an inaugural two day FIGOLOGY session in Fresno Ca., the Culinary Leadership of KOR, teamed up with industry leading food scientists, corporate chefs, restaurateurs and California Fig Industry Board members to propel the use of California Figs through contemporary innovation. The session included a deep dive into; background, history, production, varietals, and economic data of California Figs.

The group then initiated hands on R&D effort to maximize the potential impact across all primary categories of food manufacturing with a primary focus placed on clean label inventiveness. Through this session, we collaboratively blended food science and culinary arts – known as Culinology. Tremendous results were accomplished through delving into potential food service recipes and manufacturing formulation. The FIGOLOGY gathering was an immense success in hopes to inspire the industry that “When you think Figs, think California.”

KOR Represents The Spice Hunter at Fancy Foods 2016

By | Events, Trade Shows, Travel | No Comments

The KOR team presented on behalf of The Spice Hunter this past week at the Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco. The KOR Culinary Team put together inspired dishes featuring bold flavors from The Spice Hunter. Highlighting their innovative “Smoky Turmeric” and “Chipotle Cinnamon” Global Fusion Rubs™, we created spice-infused concepts such as crave-worthy Bloody Mary blends, bars and bites! Over the course of the two day event, our own CEO John Csukor served over 1000 portions! A big thanks to The Spice Hunter for a great opportunity, and cheers to their success!

[PREZI] Toasting Around the World

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A proper meal must always begin with a proper toast. While most chefs travel internationally to expand their culinary knowledge, they might not always feel prepared to lead a toast abroad. Although a simple toast can begin with a “Cheers” to good health and fortune in America, other countries have different toasting procedures. Click through the Prezi below or select the autoplay feature to learn how to properly toast when traveling and dining abroad!