Margarita Mayhem

By | Beverages, Consumption, Food for thought, Recipes, Terminology, Travel | No Comments

In celebration of National Margarita Day, here’s your boozy history lesson! In 1937, the Cafe Royal incorporated a cocktail book that had a recipe for a Picador using the same amount of tequila, triple sec and lime juice as a Margarita. There is a very early story of the Margarita being invented in 1938 by Carlos Herrera at his restaurant Rancho La Gloria. He created this concoction for a customer who was allergic to a lot of spirits but not tequila. Whichever story is true, we love a refreshing Marg on a warm… no, let me correct myself, ANY day. The “Original Margarita” recipe given by Cointreau has 1 part white tequila, 1/2 part Cointreau and 1/2 part fresh lime juice. We believe the key ingredient is not only great tequila but the freshly squeezed lime juice!

Here’s a different version of the Margarita to try at home and impress your friends, family or just yourself:

Spicy Grapefruit Margarita- yield 1 drink


1 tsp agave nectar or 2 tsp simple syrup

1 oz freshly squeezed lime juice

2 oz grapefruit juice (you can use half of a grapefruit)

2 oz blanco/silver Tequila (1.5 oz if you like it less strong)

1 thinly sliced jalapeño


2 parts salt

1 part chili powder


lime wedges

grapefruit wedges


Prepare your garnish and glass: On a flat plate, mix together salt and chili powder. Take your grapefruit slices (make sure you cut a small slice in the middle of each), lightly toss them in the sugar. Run your lime along the glass rim then roll it into your salt mixture.

In a cocktail shaker: add lime juice, agave nectar or simple syrup and jalapeños. Use a muddler to crush the jalapeños, pour in the grapefruit juice and tequila, top the shaker with ice and close. Shake your heart out!

Strain the mixture into your prepped glass. Garnish with your sugared grapefruit and enjoy!

Rhubarb-Ginger Jam Recipe

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Rhubarb-Ginger Jam


4 cups Diced Rhubarb

2 1⁄2 cups Sugar

6 Tbsp. Crystallized Ginger

2 Tbsp. Grated Lemon Peel


  • Combine all the ingredients in a medium saucepan, stirring over medium high heat until sugar dissolves.
  • Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to medium. Simmer until jam thickens and mounds on a spoon (about 20 minutes); stir often to prevent scorching.
  • Transfer to jars, cover and chill. Keep refrigerated.


The truth behind Tapas (Tapas or Tapeo)

By | Consumption, Dining, Food for thought, Food Trends, Photography, Recipes, Terminology, Travel | No Comments

Tapas are all the rage in Spain, and are the norm. A ‘tapa” small bite of free food that accompanies any beverage (alcoholic or not) consumed at any bar of the Iberian Peninsula. You heard that right, tapas are free in Spain!

Tapas are one of the most acclaimed memories from any traveler who has spent time sipping a cold “cerveza” or any Spanish “vino”. Tapa literally means “lid” or “to cover” something. Every bar in Spain has its own specialty tapas, ranging from the Gambas al Ajillo (Garlic Shrimp) spicy potatoes (Patatas Bravas) to stewed snails (Caracoles) or the classic serrano ham and manchego cheese.

A couple of theories indicate the origins of the famous tapa dish. The most traditional origin of tapas began with the proliferation of fruit flies around the southern vineyards during spring and sizzling summer season. Fruit flies are those magical bugs that can appear by hundreds and all disappear in a fraction of a second without a trace. They also have a “sophisticated “nose for diving in any fermented liquid, alcoholic or not.

Well, the purpose of the “tapa” was to cover the glass during conversation at the southern vineyards in the spring and summer to avoid the flying swimmers in the glass. The proprietor of one of this establishment had a genius idea……. why not placing a small plate on top of the glass?? And then they added a piece of cheese or cured meat to the lid…. This is so far, the most believe assumption about this world phenomena!

Another interesting theory of the tapas origin derived during the seasonal local festivities in Seville, located at the south-east part of the country. King Alfonso XIII was sipping a reasonable quantity of wine, when the monarch started to feel a little bit tipsy. He suddenly demanded a snack to sober up, in order to keep enjoying the vino without any symptom of intoxication. The tapa has reached incredible popularity around the world due to its simplicity in nature and ability to customize based on locality.

Let’s talk a little bit about the “Tapeo” or the tapas hopping movement, a whole entire experience that I recommend to anyone who comes to Spain! Any day is perfect for it, but one of the best days for the tapas hunt will be during the weekend, where everybody gets out of the house to enjoy the Mediterranean sun. Here’s how to master tapas hopping: Gather a small group of family or friends, find a good starting bar and keep going up or down the neighborhood streets looking for the desired specialty. Don’t forget that every glass of wine or beer will come up with a little surprise full of flavor that will continue during your gastronomical experience.

Here’s an easy tapa you can make at home and enjoy with a nice glass of white Spanish wine.

Gambas al Ajillo (Garlic Shrimp)

YIELD 4 servings


12 ea. Medium Size Raw Shrimp (Peeled)

4 Tbsp. Olive Oil

2 ea. Garlic Cloves Fine Sliced

½ Tbsp. Cayenne Pepper Fine Sliced

Salt and White Pepper to taste


Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.

Add garlic; cook, stirring until garlic is fragrant and golden (but not brown), about 30 seconds. Add sliced cayenne pepper, cook for 10 seconds, add shrimp; raise heat to medium-high and cook, stirring often, until shrimp are opaque for 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.
Serve immediately with some toasted bread on the side for dipping!

By: Chef Daniel Graban-Lopez

Buen provecho!

Spicy Holiday Sliders

By | Consumption, Dining, Food for thought, Food Styling, Food Trends, Holidays, Photography, Recipes | No Comments

Yes, it’s here, the wonderful and magical holiday season! This year, don’t let that scare you when it comes to cooking…everything else…maybe. It’s cold outside so spice up your holidays with this awesome recipe coming to you straight from the KOR Kitchen!
We suggest an awesome pork slider, like no other, to serve as an appetizer while everyone is waiting for his or her big meal. Give those pork tenderloins a good rub and prepare for your house to smell like deliciousness. Pair with any of your favorite toppings; we suggest using arugula instead of lettuce for that peppery bite!
Check out UnKORked on Friday for a wonderful sweet pairing to this spicy slider.

Chipotle Pork Sliders- Serves four adults / 12 Sliders


1 ea.                     Pork Tenderloin Trimmed (16 oz. approx.)
½ Tbsp.                Chipotle seasoning, dry
½ Tbsp.                Onion Powder
½ Tbsp.                 Garlic Powder
1 tsp.                     Salt
2 tsp.                     Canola or Olive Oil for rubbing the tenderloin
1 cup                     Arugula, washed and spun dry
12 ea.                    Slider Buns
24 ea.                    Dill Pickle Slices (Optional for garnish)


Rub the tenderloin with the oil. Combine the chipotle seasoning, salt, onion powder and season the tenderloin evenly. Marinate for one hour or overnight for more intense flavor.

Adjust an oven rack to the middle position; heat the oven to 400 degrees. Heat the skillet over medium-high flame. Place the tenderloin in the skillet; cook until well browned, about 3 minutes. Using tongs, rotate the tenderloin 1/4 turn; cook until well browned, 45 to 60 seconds. Repeat until all sides are browned, about 1 minute longer. Transfer the tenderloin to a rimmed baking sheet and place in the oven; roast until the internal temperature registers 135 to 140 degrees on an instant-read thermometer, around 10 to 15 minutes.

Transfer the tenderloin to a cutting board and let it rest 8 to 10 minutes. Cut the tenderloins crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices.

Assemble the sliders with the buns,arugula and dill pickle slices.

Let us know if you try our recipe and how it goes. Enjoy!


Latitudinal Cuisine™: Greek Tacos

By | Food Trends, Latitudinal Cuisine(TM), Photography, Recipes | No Comments

LatCuisine_TacoCollageTo provide you with an example of Latitudinal Cuisine™, the KOR team spent a Friday afternoon crafting Greek Tacos at the studio! Simply read below for more information about the ingredients we used, and refer to our procedure for general guidelines. We recommend that you adjust this recipe as desired, and hope you enjoy the combination of cuisines as much as we did! Read More

The Mysterious Blackstrap Molasses

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05_Molasses_v2Although uncommonly found in the average American’s pantry, blackstrap molasses is called for in many cookie, cake, and baked bean recipes. This is the thickest, darkest, and most dense form of molasses and is made by boiling sugar cane juice three times. Through this process, remaining sugars have been fully caramelized, which lends the robust and bittersweet flavor to your recipes.

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KOR and the Almond Board Showcase New Concepts at IFT14

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KOR Food Innovation recently partnered with the Almond Board for the Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting + Food Expo in New Orleans. We showcased a variety of innovative concepts during the show, including a variation on our now well-known almond crème. It plated like a cultured dairy-like spread not too dissimilar to a cheese spread. As always, all the recipe / formulas can be found at ALMONDS.COM, let us know which are your favorites.

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The Elby’s Cocktail Recipes

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ElbyPunch_FinalRGBAs the Creative Cocktail Sponsor at the 2014 Elby’s, we truly enjoyed rubbing elbows with the best of Richmond’s local food scene. We know that those that tried the “Elby Punch” at the reception loved the full recipe! For those who did not get a chance to attend, we have included the full recipes here for you to try on your own. Cheers!

In order to recreate the “Elby Punch,” please follow the directions below for both the Lemongrass Punch and Orange Oleo Saccharum Ice Cubes.

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